21 stories
·
1 follower

Studio Ibbini Juxtaposes Negative Space and Botanical Filigree in New Laser-Cut Paper Works

1 Share
two hands hold a rectangular floral work that appears to grow vines

All images © Studio Ibbini, shared with permission

Artist Julia Ibbini and computer scientist Stéphane Noyer of the Abu Dhabi-based Studio Ibbini (previously) continue to collaborate on intricately constructed works that fall at the intersection of art and mathematics. The duo creates vessels and flat pieces by layering laser-cut papers into complex structures replete with floral filigree and ornate patterning.

While many of their three-dimensional sculptures appear to twist upward in tight, perfectly aligned rows, the pair incorporates more negative space into their recent pieces, many of which seem to morph from architectural or ornamental motifs into wild, botanical growths. Ibbini tells Colossal that this requires finding a delicate balance between the frail material and the resulting form to maintain the work’s structural integrity. She explains the process:

In the pieces that seem to be fading away, hand-made drawings are turned into computational tree structures and density maps on which graph theory and probabilistic algorithms are applied. Through this, we are able to manipulate the geometry of the work so that it looks almost as though the details are slowly eroding into empty space in the final piece.

Studio Ibbini will show works with Long-Sharp Gallery at Art Miami starting next week and in a group exhibition at Sharjah Art Museum from December 13 to January 21. Keep up with the duo’s latest sculptures on Instagram.

 

a hand touches a swooshing vessel with tessellating patterns

a hand holds an elaborately designed vessel

a detail of ornate patterns layered on top of each other to create an intricately motif on a vessel

a hand touches a vessel with negative space

a detail of a vase with floral filigree

a rectangular work on a blue backdrop. the piece appears to fade in parts

two architectural works in white that appear to fade

a detail of delicately layered floral filigree

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article Studio Ibbini Juxtaposes Negative Space and Botanical Filigree in New Laser-Cut Paper Works appeared first on Colossal.

Read the whole story
tairar
88 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

An Illuminated Starburst Explodes and Punctures a Former Warehouse in Malaysia

2 Shares

All images © Jun Ong, shared with permission

A follow-up to the massive, six-pointed star that pierced a concrete building back in 2015, a new site-specific work by Malaysian artist Jun Ong bores through a former warehouse in Kuala Lumpur. “STAR/KL” is an illuminated installation comprised of 111 LED beams in various sizes that burst outward in the open-air structure, impaling the chainlink fence, support columns, and facade of the Air Building at The Godown art center. Described as an “extraterrestrial light being,” the glowing public work performs a hypnotic dance of flashes and flickers each night with an accompanying sound component by Reza Othman, who’s part of the experimental electronic and jazz project RAO.

“STAR/KL” is up through March 26, 2022, although its light will fade gradually during the next few months until it extinguishes entirely. You can see more of the otherworldly piece and dive into Ong’s process on Instagram. You also might enjoy this radiant intervention by Ian Strange. (via designboom)

 

Read the whole story
tairar
790 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Dickbars Don’t Work

1 Comment and 5 Shares

Josh Clark, back in March:

Hey, please, under no circumstances should you pin social buttons to the top or bottom of mobile screens. In an effort to try to boost mobile use of share buttons, About.com experimented with fixing them to screen bottom and separately to screen top, so that the buttons were always visible when scrolling. While this did modestly increase share-button usage, it also caused overall session engagement to go down.

You read that right: adding a locked toolbar to the small-screen experience shortened sessions and reduced page views. The very small increase in share-button usage was far outweighed by reduced site usage. (I can’t explain why this is the case, but I’ve seen it elsewhere with locked toolbars, too. They chase small-screen users away.)

Read the whole article. First, Clark’s advice is based on actual results, not just opinion and hunches (like mine). Second, he doesn’t advise against ever showing custom sharing buttons — but he does say only to show them to visitors coming from social media referrals. And but even then, don’t put them in fixed position dickbars.

As for why dickbars actually decrease site usage, I think the answer is obvious: when people see user-hostile fixed position bars at the top and/or bottom of their display, especially on phones, they’re annoyed, and the easiest way to eliminate the annoyance is to close the fucking tab and move on to something that isn’t annoying.

Read the whole story
tairar
2427 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
DaftDoki
2433 days ago
reply
I like the term dickbar and hope that it catches on.
Seattle

The neural network has really really bad ideas for paint names.

2 Shares

source: http://lewisandquark.tumblr.com/post...
Read the whole story
tairar
2466 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

What did Donald Trump do today?He advised the graduates of Liberty University th...

1 Comment and 3 Shares

What did Donald Trump do today?

He advised the graduates of Liberty University that “nothing is easier—or more pathetic—than being a critic, because they’re people that can’t get the job done.”

Since taking office 114 days ago, and counting only things he has said on his private Twitter account, Donald Trump has criticized protestors, celebrities, CNN, the city of Chicago, Chelsea Manning, Mexico, the New York Times, the Washington Post, "Europe, and, indeed, the world," Sen. John McCain (R-NV) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (jointly), Delta Airlines, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), Democrats (collectively), Nancy Pelosi, the Obama administration (collectively), UC-Berkeley, Iran, Arnold Schwarzenegger, the media, the United States (collectively), "this so-called judge" (James Robart), "any negative polls," "the horrible, dangerous and wrong decision" to suspend his Muslim ban, Nordstrom's, the time it took to reach a decision upholding the suspension of his Muslim ban, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Cuomo's interviewing skills, Sen. John McCain (R-NV) (individually), the upholding of the suspension of his Muslim ban, the legal system as a whole, Mark Cuban, leakers, Hillary Clinton, the NSA and the FBI (jointly), the US intelligence community (collectively), the Affordable Care Act, "liberal activists," the FBI (specifically), Barack Obama, "a reporter, who nobody ever heard of" (Trump biography author David Cay Johnston), North Korea, China, Germany, NBC, ABC, the Freedom Caucus, Bill Clinton, John Podesta, Reps. Mark Meadows (R-NC), Jim Jordan (R-OH), and Raul Labrador (R-ID) (jointly), "Sleepy Eyes" Chuck Todd, Susan Rice (via retweet, then later directly), people asking to see his tax returns, the "super Liberal Democrat in the Georgia Congressiol [sic] race" (Jon Ossoff), Canada, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (but he actually meant a non-appellate judge whose ruling would go to the Ninth Circuit), the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (for real this time), whichever president let the Civil War happen, Senate rules, then-FBI Director James Comey, Rexnord Corp., Sally Yates, and his own communications department--most of them more than once.

Why is this a bad thing?

  • Actually, it's good advice.
Read the whole story
tairar
2478 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
deezil
2478 days ago
reply
!
Shelbyville, Kentucky

Code Quality 3

4 Comments and 16 Shares
It's like a half-solved cryptogram where the solution is a piece of FORTH code written by someone who doesn't know FORTH.
Read the whole story
tairar
2487 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
4 public comments
majuje19
2476 days ago
reply
Que lo mire alguien que no sea el Cuco
hansschmucker
2486 days ago
reply
Why do I see many colleagues (past and present) in this picture 😆
alt_text_bot
2487 days ago
reply
It's like a half-solved cryptogram where the solution is a piece of FORTH code written by someone who doesn't know FORTH.
rickhensley
2487 days ago
reply
So it's securely obscured?
Ohio
Brstrk
2487 days ago
It was until the new hire pushed the keys to their branch.
Next Page of Stories