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An Illuminated Starburst Explodes and Punctures a Former Warehouse in Malaysia

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All images © Jun Ong, shared with permission

A follow-up to the massive, six-pointed star that pierced a concrete building back in 2015, a new site-specific work by Malaysian artist Jun Ong bores through a former warehouse in Kuala Lumpur. “STAR/KL” is an illuminated installation comprised of 111 LED beams in various sizes that burst outward in the open-air structure, impaling the chainlink fence, support columns, and facade of the Air Building at The Godown art center. Described as an “extraterrestrial light being,” the glowing public work performs a hypnotic dance of flashes and flickers each night with an accompanying sound component by Reza Othman, who’s part of the experimental electronic and jazz project RAO.

“STAR/KL” is up through March 26, 2022, although its light will fade gradually during the next few months until it extinguishes entirely. You can see more of the otherworldly piece and dive into Ong’s process on Instagram. You also might enjoy this radiant intervention by Ian Strange. (via designboom)

 

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tairar
151 days ago
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Dickbars Don’t Work

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Josh Clark, back in March:

Hey, please, under no circumstances should you pin social buttons to the top or bottom of mobile screens. In an effort to try to boost mobile use of share buttons, About.com experimented with fixing them to screen bottom and separately to screen top, so that the buttons were always visible when scrolling. While this did modestly increase share-button usage, it also caused overall session engagement to go down.

You read that right: adding a locked toolbar to the small-screen experience shortened sessions and reduced page views. The very small increase in share-button usage was far outweighed by reduced site usage. (I can’t explain why this is the case, but I’ve seen it elsewhere with locked toolbars, too. They chase small-screen users away.)

Read the whole article. First, Clark’s advice is based on actual results, not just opinion and hunches (like mine). Second, he doesn’t advise against ever showing custom sharing buttons — but he does say only to show them to visitors coming from social media referrals. And but even then, don’t put them in fixed position dickbars.

As for why dickbars actually decrease site usage, I think the answer is obvious: when people see user-hostile fixed position bars at the top and/or bottom of their display, especially on phones, they’re annoyed, and the easiest way to eliminate the annoyance is to close the fucking tab and move on to something that isn’t annoying.

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tairar
1789 days ago
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DaftDoki
1794 days ago
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I like the term dickbar and hope that it catches on.
Seattle

The neural network has really really bad ideas for paint names.

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source: http://lewisandquark.tumblr.com/post...
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tairar
1827 days ago
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What did Donald Trump do today?He advised the graduates of Liberty University th...

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What did Donald Trump do today?

He advised the graduates of Liberty University that “nothing is easier—or more pathetic—than being a critic, because they’re people that can’t get the job done.”

Since taking office 114 days ago, and counting only things he has said on his private Twitter account, Donald Trump has criticized protestors, celebrities, CNN, the city of Chicago, Chelsea Manning, Mexico, the New York Times, the Washington Post, "Europe, and, indeed, the world," Sen. John McCain (R-NV) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (jointly), Delta Airlines, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), Democrats (collectively), Nancy Pelosi, the Obama administration (collectively), UC-Berkeley, Iran, Arnold Schwarzenegger, the media, the United States (collectively), "this so-called judge" (James Robart), "any negative polls," "the horrible, dangerous and wrong decision" to suspend his Muslim ban, Nordstrom's, the time it took to reach a decision upholding the suspension of his Muslim ban, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Cuomo's interviewing skills, Sen. John McCain (R-NV) (individually), the upholding of the suspension of his Muslim ban, the legal system as a whole, Mark Cuban, leakers, Hillary Clinton, the NSA and the FBI (jointly), the US intelligence community (collectively), the Affordable Care Act, "liberal activists," the FBI (specifically), Barack Obama, "a reporter, who nobody ever heard of" (Trump biography author David Cay Johnston), North Korea, China, Germany, NBC, ABC, the Freedom Caucus, Bill Clinton, John Podesta, Reps. Mark Meadows (R-NC), Jim Jordan (R-OH), and Raul Labrador (R-ID) (jointly), "Sleepy Eyes" Chuck Todd, Susan Rice (via retweet, then later directly), people asking to see his tax returns, the "super Liberal Democrat in the Georgia Congressiol [sic] race" (Jon Ossoff), Canada, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (but he actually meant a non-appellate judge whose ruling would go to the Ninth Circuit), the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (for real this time), whichever president let the Civil War happen, Senate rules, then-FBI Director James Comey, Rexnord Corp., Sally Yates, and his own communications department--most of them more than once.

Why is this a bad thing?

  • Actually, it's good advice.
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tairar
1839 days ago
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deezil
1839 days ago
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!
Louisville, Kentucky

Code Quality 3

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It's like a half-solved cryptogram where the solution is a piece of FORTH code written by someone who doesn't know FORTH.
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tairar
1848 days ago
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majuje19
1837 days ago
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Que lo mire alguien que no sea el Cuco
hansschmucker
1847 days ago
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Why do I see many colleagues (past and present) in this picture 😆
alt_text_bot
1848 days ago
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It's like a half-solved cryptogram where the solution is a piece of FORTH code written by someone who doesn't know FORTH.
rickhensley
1848 days ago
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So it's securely obscured?
Ohio
Brstrk
1848 days ago
It was until the new hire pushed the keys to their branch.

The first Kirby game was programmed without a keyboard

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This was apparently the entirety of the development hardware Masahiro Sakurai used to start programming <em>Kirby's Dream Land</em>.

This was apparently the entirety of the development hardware Masahiro Sakurai used to start programming Kirby's Dream Land. (credit: Source Gaming / Famitsu)

Any programmer of a certain age likely has a horror story about some rinky-dink coding and workflow environment that forced them to hack together a working app under extreme hardware and software constraints. Still, we're pretty sure none of those stories can beat the keyboard-free coding environment that Masahiro Sakurai apparently used to create the first Kirby's Dream Land.

The tidbit comes from a talk Sakurai gave ahead of a Japanese orchestral performance celebrating the 25th anniversary of the original Game Boy release of Kirby's Dream Land in 1992. As reported by Game Watch (and wonderfully translated by the Patreon-supported Source Gaming), Sakurai recalled how HAL Laboratory was using a Twin Famicom as a development kit at the time. Trying to program on the hardware, which combined a cartridge-based Famicom and the disk-based Famicom Disk System, was “like using a lunchbox to make lunch,” Sakurai said.

As if the limited power wasn't bad enough, Sakurai revealed that the Twin Famicom testbed they were using "didn’t even have keyboard support, meaning values had to be input using a trackball and an on-screen keyboard." Those kinds of visual programming languages may be fashionable now, but having a physical keyboard to type in values or edit instruction would have probably still been welcome back in the early '90s.

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tairar
1857 days ago
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